Thursday, September 18, 2014 Wednesday, September 17, 2014
  • parents: "schools easy"
  • me: "can you help me on this homework problem"
  • parents: "idk that shit its hard lmao"

rromanoffs:

I gave up a lot for this life. I could have been happy with Mockingbir— Bobbi. We could have had a good, simple life. But I wanted to play with the big boys. And if I miss, it means I’m just another dude with a bow. It means I’ve been fooling myself this whole time. And that’s why I never miss.

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

lukes-fave-babe:

Bae: Come over
Me; I can’t.
Bae: I got the Winter Solider on DVD
Me:

image

(Source: captain-fuck-that)

danglingthpider:

castielmyspell:

taco-of-the-violets:

castielmyspell:

things people do in fanfic no one does in real life

  • smirk every frickin five seconds
  • gulp
  • stutter to be cute
  • be like “yeah ok” when asked to call someone “daddy”
  • chuckle gently
  • chuckle in general
  • make simple misunderstandings into the biggest bitch fest you will ever experience
  • NO ONE CHUCKLES IT DOESN’T HAPPEN

I chuckled so hard at this

fuck off

*smirks*

(Source: osrick)

wait-as-i-fangirl:

inexorablyacademic:

sodomymcscurvylegs:

cameralinz:

“Is Draco alive? Is he in the castle?” The whisper was barely audible; her lips were an inch from his ear, her head bent so low that her long hair shielded his face from the onlookers. “Yes,” he breathed back. He felt the hand on his chest contract; her nails pierced him. Then it was withdrawn. She had sat up. “He is dead!” Narcissa Malfoy called to the watchers.

In the end, Voldemort’s fate twice came down to the choice of a woman, a mother.

Rock ‘n roll.

Harry Potter as a series repeatedly tells us never to underestimate a mother’s love. Lilly’s love for Harry nearly killed Voldemort the first time, Narcissa’s love for Draco set him up for his real death, and Voldemort’s greatest general was killed by Molly, a mother who loved all of her children and feared losing any more to the magical war.

Bitches. Get. Stuff. Done.

   (via)

The tags!!!

(Source: margaerystyrells)

rynnay:

watch both their faces go from “courteous TV smile” to “not paid enough for this bullshit”

(Source: mediaite)

marvelsagentcarter:

James D’Arcy (“Broadchurch,” “Let’s Be Cops”) will play Edwin Jarvis, Howard Stark’s butler and an unexpected ally to Peggy Carter, joining the previously announced Chad Michael Murray as SSR Agent Jack Thompson and Enver Gjokaj as Agent Daniel Sousa as they help Peggy (Hayley Atwell) navigate her way through what may be her most dangerous mission yet! (x)

hotboysofficial:

lady gets mugged by motorcyclist while driving

image

(Source: hotboysofficial)

nospockdasgay:

emerald-avenger:

tarteauxfraises:

kendrajbean:

In the mid-1930s, an Australian journalist visited Germany to report on the rise of fascism and interview Adolf Hitler. The atrocities she saw there, which included the public beating of Jews, forever changed the course of her young life. Nancy Wake, who died Sunday at age 98, would spend World War II fighting Nazism tooth and nail, saving thousands of Allied lives, winding up at the top of the Gestapo’s most-wanted list and ultimately receiving more decorations than any other servicewoman.
Wake made her way from Spain to Britain, where she convinced special agents to train her as a spy and guerilla operative. In April 1944 she parachuted into France to coordinate attacks on German troops and installations prior to the D-Day invasion, leading a band of 7,000 resistance fighters. In order to earn the esteem of the men under her command, she reportedly challenged them to drinking contests and would inevitably drink them under the table. But her fierceness alone may have won her enough respect: During the violent months preceding the liberation of Paris, Wake killed a German guard with a single karate chop to the neck, executed a women who had been spying for the Germans, shot her way out of roadblocks and biked 70 hours through perilous Nazi checkpoints to deliver radio codes for the Allies. (via)



I’m going to keep talking about this until you all buy her god damn biography. Because I don’t think you guys understand.
She was NUMBER ONE on the Gestapo’s most wanted list during the war.  There was a 5 MILLION FRANC prize on her head.
They called her the White Mouse because of her skill for escaping certain death. 
She was parachuting into a camp once and got tangled in a tree. A French soldier saw her flailing around and said, “I hope that all the trees in France bear such beautiful fruit this year.” She answered only, “Don’t give me that French shit.”
She would smuggle messages, food, and supplies in a supply truck and when she passed German posts she’d wink at the soldiers and say, “Do you want to search me?” They never did.
She found out at one point that her men had been hiding a female German spy, protecting her. The rule was to kill them, but the men didn’t have the heart. But Nancy Wake did. And she never regretted it.
When she killed a man with her bare hands, it was an SS sentry who’d spotted her and she killed him to prevent him from raising the alarm during the raid. She would later say of it, “They’d taught us this judo-chop stuff with the flat of the hand at SOE, and I practiced away at it. But this was the only time I used it - whack - and it killed him all right. I was really surprised.”
She died in 2011, 3 weeks before her 99th birthday.
If you don’t think Nancy Wake deserves a movie and a TV show and all the damn recognition in the world, you’re wrong. 

I am really angry that I have NEVER HEARD OF this woman.
NANCY WAKE, PEOPLE. SHE’S AWESOME.

nospockdasgay:

emerald-avenger:

tarteauxfraises:

kendrajbean:

In the mid-1930s, an Australian journalist visited Germany to report on the rise of fascism and interview Adolf Hitler. The atrocities she saw there, which included the public beating of Jews, forever changed the course of her young life. Nancy Wake, who died Sunday at age 98, would spend World War II fighting Nazism tooth and nail, saving thousands of Allied lives, winding up at the top of the Gestapo’s most-wanted list and ultimately receiving more decorations than any other servicewoman.

Wake made her way from Spain to Britain, where she convinced special agents to train her as a spy and guerilla operative. In April 1944 she parachuted into France to coordinate attacks on German troops and installations prior to the D-Day invasion, leading a band of 7,000 resistance fighters. In order to earn the esteem of the men under her command, she reportedly challenged them to drinking contests and would inevitably drink them under the table. But her fierceness alone may have won her enough respect: During the violent months preceding the liberation of Paris, Wake killed a German guard with a single karate chop to the neck, executed a women who had been spying for the Germans, shot her way out of roadblocks and biked 70 hours through perilous Nazi checkpoints to deliver radio codes for the Allies. (via)

I’m going to keep talking about this until you all buy her god damn biography. Because I don’t think you guys understand.

She was NUMBER ONE on the Gestapo’s most wanted list during the war.  There was a 5 MILLION FRANC prize on her head.

They called her the White Mouse because of her skill for escaping certain death. 

She was parachuting into a camp once and got tangled in a tree. A French soldier saw her flailing around and said, “I hope that all the trees in France bear such beautiful fruit this year.” She answered only, “Don’t give me that French shit.”

She would smuggle messages, food, and supplies in a supply truck and when she passed German posts she’d wink at the soldiers and say, “Do you want to search me?” They never did.

She found out at one point that her men had been hiding a female German spy, protecting her. The rule was to kill them, but the men didn’t have the heart. But Nancy Wake did. And she never regretted it.

When she killed a man with her bare hands, it was an SS sentry who’d spotted her and she killed him to prevent him from raising the alarm during the raid. She would later say of it, “They’d taught us this judo-chop stuff with the flat of the hand at SOE, and I practiced away at it. But this was the only time I used it - whack - and it killed him all right. I was really surprised.”

She died in 2011, 3 weeks before her 99th birthday.

If you don’t think Nancy Wake deserves a movie and a TV show and all the damn recognition in the world, you’re wrong. 

I am really angry that I have NEVER HEARD OF this woman.

NANCY WAKE, PEOPLE. SHE’S AWESOME.

Monday, September 15, 2014

fezzesareqool:

"Wait a minute…Is that a balloon?"

Dat kangaroo cat too tho.

(Source: omgbuglen)

homogayhorse:

*presses the button* *worships the button* *becomes the button*

homogayhorse:

*presses the button* *worships the button* *becomes the button*

upthawolfs:

lipatti:

celesgami:

wot4:

Good Lord is it bird o’clock already?

my grandma has this clock and i find it important to inform you all that every hour it makes the bird call sound of the bird of the hour

my grandma has this clock too and I can confirm that it does

my grandma also has this clock…

upthawolfs:

lipatti:

celesgami:

wot4:

Good Lord is it bird o’clock already?

my grandma has this clock and i find it important to inform you all that every hour it makes the bird call sound of the bird of the hour

my grandma has this clock too and I can confirm that it does

my grandma also has this clock…

jagzilla:

typette:

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:



mirrepp:





Some harsh but very very true words





 When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble.
"this is an old image…"
"I’m not happy with that one…"
"this is just a sketch…"
"I did this really quickly…"
"there is better stuff on later pages…"
It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.
But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”
You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.
This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. 
Be proud.



 This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.
Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.
Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.
Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.
i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

 The piece of advice I got that helped me the most with this is; the people looking at your work be it your director or an HR person, trust them to know and see the good work there that you’ve become desensitized to. We all have rushed shots and stuff, they can see the polished diamond inside of a rock, it’s literally their job! So don’t fret too much!

I would have to stress that you should not only eliminate this urge to shit talk your own work professionally, but as much as possible online as well. It’s important to attach as little negativity with your art piece as possible, especially on tumblr where both image and text get reblogged or otherwise shared a lot. It’s really, really hard to not have that kneejerk reaction every artist has, but it will help you feel better about your own art in the long run as well. Compliment your own art (doesn’t have to be in public), the parts you like about it and it will gradually improve your opinion of your own art.
"Yes, that arm might need some work, I’ll get more references next time! But dang! Look at that torso! I nailed this. I used to not be able to draw torsos in this angle, dayum.” Just trying to think of this as often as possible will gradually make you lose that habit of talking shit about your work to your peers or to employers. It will help you.

jagzilla:

typette:

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words


When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble.

"this is an old image…"

"I’m not happy with that one…"

"this is just a sketch…"

"I did this really quickly…"

"there is better stuff on later pages…"

It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.

But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”

You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.

This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. 

Be proud.


This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.

Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.

Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.

Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.

i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.


The piece of advice I got that helped me the most with this is; the people looking at your work be it your director or an HR person, trust them to know and see the good work there that you’ve become desensitized to. We all have rushed shots and stuff, they can see the polished diamond inside of a rock, it’s literally their job! So don’t fret too much!

I would have to stress that you should not only eliminate this urge to shit talk your own work professionally, but as much as possible online as well. It’s important to attach as little negativity with your art piece as possible, especially on tumblr where both image and text get reblogged or otherwise shared a lot. It’s really, really hard to not have that kneejerk reaction every artist has, but it will help you feel better about your own art in the long run as well. Compliment your own art (doesn’t have to be in public), the parts you like about it and it will gradually improve your opinion of your own art.

"Yes, that arm might need some work, I’ll get more references next time! But dang! Look at that torso! I nailed this. I used to not be able to draw torsos in this angle, dayum.” Just trying to think of this as often as possible will gradually make you lose that habit of talking shit about your work to your peers or to employers. It will help you.

thosenerdyfeels:

beeishappy:

Stephen Colbert on Late Night with Seth Meyers

image

TCR | 2007.03.12 | It reads: “Dear Stephen, As editor-in-chief of Marvel, I am burdened with the handling of our character’s estates and the sad event that a hero should perish before his time. Captain America’s will was read last Friday, and while heavy hearted, I am proud to announce the star spangled Avenger has bequeathed his most valuable possession, his indestructible shield, to the only man he believed had the red, white, and blue balls to carry the mantle. Stephen Colbert. Welcome to the Marvel Universe. Sincerely, Joe Quesada.

How can you but just love this?